Cool News

July 20, 2017

Country home’s glass extension transforms the living space

Magazine Feature

This property in Whitford has an amazing view, but the owners couldn’t enjoy it because their living room faced back up the driveway.

Sure, they could capture a great estuary view from the kitchen sink, but that wasn’t really good enough, says architect Darren Jessop.

“The owners bought the property, in rural Auckland, as an escape from the city. And while the existing three-bedroom barn-style house sat well in the landscape, it was not an ideal configuration.

“A secondary living space and a self-contained annex for their daughter were requested. The owners were also concerned that the area can get cold in winter, so they wanted to investigate the use of passive design technology.”

The solution from Jessop Architects was to design a double-glazed extension, with an annex that incorporates passive house technology. And while it seems strange to think a glass-walled room could be used to heat the entire ground floor of the house itself, that is what happens here.

Jessop says the annex utilises the Crib module from the firm’s CoolHouse range of fully passive homes. This is connected to the house with the glass living pavilion.

“The Crib is a 45 square-metre structure that comprises a living room and bedroom, with an interconnecting bathroom and kitchenette. In line with passive design technology, it has its own HRV system, extra insulation, and double-glazing. And while this pod can be airtight, in reality doors are often open, so it is not completely sealed.”

But that is not too much of a problem. With glazing on the east and west, the linking glass living pavilion captures the heat from the afternoon sun. It also holds the heat from a woodburning fireplace. “When the internal doors are open, the warm air circulates back to the main house, heating the rooms on the lower level,” says Jessop.

“The connecting living pavilion is a nod to the Johnson Pavilion, and it uses a full-height glass sliding door and louvred aluminium shutter system to moderate the climate inside.”

In keeping with the design of legendary US architect Philip Johnson’s glass house, the integrated external soffit is the same height as the internal ceiling, giving a seamless line between inside and out. It also contains a series of recessed downlights for mood lighting in the evening.

Jessop says the new addition complements the existing structure visually, and the owners love the fact you can see the water through the pavilion as you come down the drive.

by COLLEEN HAWKES from stuff.co.nz

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Country home's glass extension transforms the living space

October 18, 2016

The elements of Passive Design

Magazine Feature

Architect Darren Jessop worked closely with the owners of this Auckland home to create the first certified Passive House in Australasia, meeting an exacting set of international standards.

Our design for this four-bedroom home in east Auckland began typically enough. We had worked through three sketch design options with the client and had settled on one that met the budget and maximised the use of the long narrow site from a sun and space point of view.

At this point, our Canadian-American client started asking deeper questions. He was particularly interested in specifications for heating and cooling and was disappointed with the low thermal insulation standards of New Zealand homes, plus the lack of guidelines for their design and performance.

He began an extensive research journey to discover a suitable standard and technologies to support it. We needed to find one that we could adapt to our local construction methods that would also create the performance required.

Our client opted for the internationally recognised Passive House model first developed in Germany in the 1980s. Research shows that energy consumption in Passive Houses is about 80% lower than in conventional buildings. They combine high-levels of comfort with low energy consumption using high thermal insulation and heat recovery systems.
Informed by this model, we based our construction on five basic design elements:

1. Clever compact design that optimises the use of natural resources for comfort.
2. High insulation to ensure the house stays warm once heated and remains cool in summer.
3. No thermal bridging so that the inside of the house isn’t affected by the exterior conditions.
4. Air-tight construction for optimal control of the ventilation system.
5. Consistent air circulation for a continual supply of fresh air at perfect living temperatures.

This was modelled at the design stage using software developed in Germany.

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July 14, 2015

An idea whose time has come

Magazine Feature

Pamela Bell is the CEO of Prefab NZ. ‘Her organisation’s Value Case for prefabrication, produced with BRANZ and the Productivity Partnership last year, claimed that greater use of prefabrication can remove $25,000 to $40,000 from the cost of a standard home, mostly through savings.’ At Coolhouse, we can vouch for it. It’s no longer a method for dreary school buildings. Prefabrication is a building approach that ‘is capable of combining stylish design with highly efficient and accurate offsite manufacturing methods’.

As quoted by Bell, ‘”the number one advantage to using more prebuilt parts is about controlling quality, because you can do that better indoors than on site”‘. The article goes on to state: “Prefabrication basically means that a lot more stuff happens in the planning stage. The result is that the consumer ends up with a known quantity: known quality, known timeframe, known costs, sustainability and design.”

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Save

April 21, 2015

Building Healthy Houses

Magazine Feature
‘New Zealand has been called the “land of the unhealthy house” and it seems we’re still building them that way. Despite tougher energy-efficiency standards introduced this century and greater uptake of double glazing and other technologies, many of our new houses are cold, damp and energy intensive. So does offsite manufacturing offer a way to healthier homes?’


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April 21, 2015

Low energy passive housing

Interview

Want to know more about passive housing?
Darren Jessop (Coolhouse architect) get’s interviewed by RadioLIVE.

TO LISTEN, CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO THE RIGHT

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July 31, 2014

Feature in the Design Guide

Magazine Feature
Coolhouse architect Darren Jessop worked closely with the owners of this Auckland home to create the first certified Passive House in Australasia, meeting an exacting set of international standards

TO READ MORE CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO THE RIGHT

design-guide

July 25, 2014

Finalist in the 2014 Passive House Institute Awards

Awards
We are pretty stoked to be a finalist in the 2014 Passive House Awards (single family homes category)!

“The finalists of the Passive House Award 2014 have again proved that world-class architecture and the Passive House Standard complement each other perfectly. An international jury made the final selection from approximately hundred submissions.”

WE EVEN HAVE OUR VERY OWN SHINY CERTIFICATE OVER TO THE RIGHT FOR YOUR VIEWING PLEASURE

award

July 25, 2014

Coolhouse goes national

Magazine Feature
Houses talks to our very own green building proponent, architect Darren Jessop about putting the ‘clean, green’ back into New Zealand’s buildings.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO THE RIGHT

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June 1, 2014

Verve Magazine article May 2014

Magazine Feature
The Coolhouse features yet again, this time in the trendy Verve Magazine! Thanks Guys!

WANT TO KNOW MORE? CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO THE RIGHT